Pathway Partner

Living a limitless life

Sometimes we are guilty of placing limits on ourselves. “I cannot do this”, This will be too hard”, “This will never work”. If we continue to use this kind of thinking and speaking, we could get ourselves into a rut. One of the ways I think can help with this limited life is to live in the present moment. When we are mindful, there are no limits. The sky is literally the limit because we are not comparing anything to the past or to the future, we are just in the now.

Practicing mindfulness is not that easy however – here is an easy meditation to practice.

• Sit still in a comfortable position with your eyes open and fixed about 5 feet in front of you with your gaze down to the floor.
• Focus on your breath coming and going.
• Notice the sights, sounds and smells around you, but come back to your breath.
• Practice this for about 5 minutes every day and as it gets easier, add 1 minute per day.

Other ways to introduce mindfulness into your life…

• Pay attention to what you’re doing as you’re doing it.
• Practice eating meals in silence and chewing each bite for 25 – 40 times, really paying attention to each flavor of the food you are eating.
• When you are driving, do so without the radio or cell phone and notice the route you are taking and maybe even take a different route to make the drive more interesting instead of routine.
• Put less on your “To do” list so you can enjoy what you are doing.
• When you are with others, put away the electronics and “Be” with that person, in the present moment.
• Practice the mindful meditation above for at least 5 minutes each day.

So the next time you think you have limits on your life, bring yourself to the present and realize you really have a limitless life, you just need to practice how to live it.

Namaste

FREE Yoga Discussion and Demonstration at the Fraser Public Library

Join us on Saturday, February, 2nd for a FREE discussion on yoga as well as short yoga practice for both the mat and the chair. This is a great opportunity for anyone who has wanted to try yoga, but isn’t sure what it entails or what it is all about. There are so many benefits from yoga and it is truly suitable for anyone. Please RSVP to the Fraser Public Library so they can be sure to save you a spot. If you want to participate in the mat yoga practice, please be sure to bring a yoga mat or beach towel. There are chairs there if you want to participate in the chair portion of the class.

Juicing Video

So, Dr. Mercola has a blog that I follow. He talks about the benefits of juicing and he even recommends an older version of the juicer my family purchased. We have the Omega 8006 and we love it. We purchased it last October and we’ve been juicing at least once a day since we got it. We’ve had some really wonderful juices and it is such an easy juicer to use and to clean. It is a masticating juicer as opposed to centrifugal one, which means that it squeezes all the juice out of the fruit or vegetable instead of spinning the produce so fast it actually heats up!

Check out this video my son shot of me while I was making an apple, carrot juice for him and his cousin. It is so easy to use as well as clean up. If you haven’t juiced before, it’s really a great way to get all the fruits and vegetables into your day. Check out the video here.

Here a few simple recipes that you can try. Keep in mind, juice what you’re going to drink. Bacteria can breed on juice that is sitting around for more than an hour or so. Another thing to consider, if you’re going to go through all the trouble of juicing, be sure to use organic produce that you wash. You want to be sure that you juice the whole fruit or vegetable and you do not want any pesticide residue floating around in your juice.

Apple, Carrot Juice
(2) large apples seeded and sliced
(2) large carrots ends cut off (cut and save the greens for a soup, stew or sauce)

Apple, Carrot, Ginger Juice
Same as above but add 1/4 inch of fresh ginger root

Romaine, Pineapple Juice
1/2 peeled and cored pineapple
1/2 head of romaine lettuce

Raspberry, Cantaloupe Juice
1/2 peeled cantaloupe
8 oz of fresh or frozen raspberries

Apple, Carrot, Kale, Cucumber Juice
(2) large apples seeded and sliced
(2) large carrots ends cut off (cut and save the greens for a soup, stew or sauce)
1/2 cucumber (peeled if not organic)
4 large kale leaves (with stems)

New Year… New Opportunities

With each new year, we are able to create new opportunities. We can shed bad habits, negative thoughts and anything else from the previous year we do not want to carry over into this new one. As we take a moment to reflect on the past year, do so without any judgments. As you come into the new year, do so without any expectations. What I mean by this is do not look at your year past and say negative things about what you did or did not do. About what did or did not happen. All of this is in the past and we can not do anything to change the year past. What we can do, however, is take this new year and create new opportunities for ourselves in both our personal and professional lives. We can create intentions for ourselves daily, weekly, monthly, etc. without worrying about the future, just intending on the opportunities we want to create for ourselves.

A great way to prepare for our present moment (not dwelling on the past year or fretting about this new year) is to practice mindfulness. This can be done very easily by sitting in a comfortable position for 5 – 10 minutes and just noticing what is going on around you. Do this practice with your spine nice and straight. Imagine there is a string going down the spine all the way from the crown of the head to the tailbone. Imagine someone is pulling the string from the crown of the head so you are seated nice and straight with the spine, neck and head in alignment. With the hands placed in your lap or just relaxed on your thighs, start to notice what is going on around you in the space that surrounds you. In this practice, you will keep your eyes open and focused either at the tip of the nose or on the ground 5 – 6 feet in front of you. Start by noticing how you are feeling at this time and name the feeling ie: tense, happy, hungry, angry, tired, etc. Then, start to notice what is going on in the room you are in. Is the light on, is there music, is it hot, cold, what noises are you hearing? Just observe all of this. When your mind starts to wander, come back to noticing the room and the sights and sounds of it. If you can practice this for a few minutes each day, this will be one more tool you have that will help you to be in the present moment more often than you currently are.

This New Year can offer you so many opportunities. Come into each day as if it’s the first day you have lived and with no expectations. Enjoy this New Year and I hope it brings you happiness, good health and prosperity and peace to our planet.

Namaste

Slow Food Movement

There is a lot of talk about slowing down when eating. Not only does it help you to lose weight (as it takes your brain 20 minutes to feel like you’re full), but it also helps us to practice mindfulness. In the meditation  classes I teach, we practice eating something very slowly to really observe everything about the food that we are eating – from the initial smell of the food, to the texture of the food and of course the taste of the food.

This week on Dr. Andrew Weil’s newsletter, he gives us a little more insight to the Slow Food Movement.  I have posted it here…

The Slow Food Movement – which started in Italy in the 1980s – encourages people to slow the pace of life in order to truly savor not only foods and beverages, but the pleasure of eating, the companionship of friends and family sitting around the table, and enjoying the company of others. Traditional foods that are fresh, made from local ingredients, and served during leisurely meals are the focus of this movement. From a health perspective, this philosophy is a much-needed departure from “fast foods” which are designed to be eaten on the run and are often made of highly processed ingredients. If you want to follow the philosophy of the Slow Food Movement, start by shopping for fresh, organically grown local produce and baked goods at farmers’ markets; patronize restaurants that specialize in local or regional foods; and keep family traditions alive. Think about the foods your grandparents prepared for holidays or family gatherings, and try to replicate what you can.

If you want to learn more about the Slow Food Movement USA, click here.
Remember, slow down, enjoy and live in the moment!

Page 4 of 12« First...23456...10...Last »

Our Store

ad
ad
ad
ad